Arbor Hills Tree Farm, LLC
Phone: (402) 895-3635
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Skyline Honeylocust Tree Facts

skyline honeylocust tree

The thornless skyline honeylocust tree has captured the hearts of arborists, community foresters and homeowners throughout America. And no wonder. This tree is easy to plant, grows fast, has reasonably strong branches, is aesthetically pleasing and is tough enough to withstand just about any urban setting.

It has a distinctive pyramidal form. Develops a strong sturdy trunk and is excellent for where filtered shade is desired in your landscape. It has a beautiful yellow foliage color in the fall season.

Skyline Honeylocust Tree Facts

A very important tree for difficult climates. Skyline Honeylocust tree leaf out later than most other shade trees, thus protecting them from devastating late spring freezes and heavy snow. This tree is also very water thrifty and heat tolerant.

Fall Season

Another good reason to plant skyline honeylocust tree is because they drop their leaves earlier in the fall which keeps them from being damaged by early hard freezes and heavy snow. Upright, spreading, uniform branches form a broadly pyramidal shade tree. Finely textured, dark green, fern-like foliage turns golden-yellow in fall. An excellent choice for lawn areas because its deep roots stay well below the surface. Thornless. Hardy to -30°F Maximum Elevation: 6,000 ft.

Hardiness Zones

The thornless skyline honeylocust tree can be expected to grow in Hardiness Zones 3–9.

Growth Rate

Skyline honeylocust tree grows at a fast rate, with height increases of more than 24″ per year.

Sun Preference

Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least six hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.

Attributes

Skyline Honeylocust tree:

  • Is very easy to plant and grow.
  • Provides showy yellow color in the fall.
  • Features pinnately or bipinnately compound leaves approximately 8″ long with 8–14 leaflets. They are among the last leaves to emerge in the spring.
  • Produces small, greenish-yellow blossoms arranged around spike-like stalks that are notably fragrant.
  • Yields large, brown seed pods resembling twisted leather straps that are 7–8″ long, sometimes reaching up to 18″ in length.
  • Develops a thin, airy crown that provides dappled shade while allowing grass to grow beneath.
  • Tolerates wet and dry sites, salt, compacted soil, pollution and most other urban stresses.
  • Grows in an oval or round shape.
  • Can be used on hillsides to stabilize poor soil and control erosion.

Planting & Care for Trees – skyline honeylocust tree

Preparation

  • Honeylocust make a perfect deciduous tree in a yard that doesn’t want heavy shade.
  • Some selections start out with light yellow leaves that turn green and then yellow again in fall.
  • Honeylocust are tolerant to urban conditions, including air pollution and salt spray, so make great street trees. However, older selections produce brown seedpods that drop in fall and can become messy. They also may have thorns that can be dangerous when working around the tree.
  • Plant from spring or early fall in well-drained, deep, fertile soil. However, honeylocust are also tolerant of various soil types. Space trees 20 to 30 feet apart.

Opening Plant Material

  • Bare Root – Cut open the bundle (top and roots are tied) and separate all the plants. Soak roots in buckets of water until planted. Each plant type will be labeled separately for identification. Do not expose the roots to sun. They should never dry out. Keep roots covered. All bare-root plants must be trimmed when planted.
  • B&B – Soak root ball very well.
  • Containers – Completely saturate all container plants by putting in a larger container of water until stops bubbling, remove. Now you’re ready to plant.
  • Each type of plant has an illustration on how to plant if you scroll down and click on the orange rectangular box “Handling & Plant Guidelines”.

Planting Bare Root

  • Plant Bare root in fall. A good indicator if you can still plant is if the ground is still workable you’re good to go. If a hard frost is expected be sure to hold off on planting.
  • Dig a hole at least 6″ wider and the same depth as the root mass. The crown or graft of the plant should be slightly higher than ground level where it was grown at the nursery.
  • Trim off the broken roots and branches.
  • Place fertilizer packets in hole (if purchased). Do not place other fertilizers in the planting hole. *Use our recommended fertilizer.
  • Spread the roots and fill halfway with soil, then water until soil settles completely saturating the soil and planting pit.
  • Re-adjust plant and fill the hole with the rest of the soil.
  • Back fill the balance of the soil and water well.
  • See our link below “Handling & Planting Guidelines” for illustrations on planting.

Planting B&B trees

  • Plant B&B trees in spring or fall. A good indicator if you can still plant is if the ground is still workable you’re good to go. If a hard frost is expected be sure to hold off on planting.
  • Dig a hole at least 6″ wider and no deeper than the size of the ball on the plant. Rotate the plant to the proper position. Never lift or move trees by the tops.
  • Notice where the base of the trunk flairs out from the tree. This is called the root flair. This root flair should show when the tree is planted. If necessary, add soil under the ball so the root flair is exposed.
  • Place fertilizer packets into the bottom of the hole (if purchased). *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer
  • Backfill ½ of the hole with soil and completely saturate the soil with water.
  • Once the tree is straight and located as desired, cut and remove twine. Then, remove or bend back top ⅓ of metal basket. Lastly, remove exposed burlap from top of ball
  • Fill the hole to the top of the ball with soil, then soak well with water and let settle.
  • The top of the root ball should be visible and slightly higher than the soil around it.
  • Add mulch on top of soil making sure to not put mulch against the trunk or stems.
  • See our link below “Handling & Planting Guidelines” for illustrations on planting.

Planting containers

  • Slide plant from pot by tapping on the bottom of the pot.
  • Dig a hole no deeper than the depth of the container and 6″ or more, making sure it’s wider on the sides
  • With shovel or knife trim bottom 2″ off of the root ball for plants in plastic containers.
  • Rotate the plant to the proper position. Never lift or move plants by the tops.
  • Place the root ball in the hole.
  • Notice where the base of the trunk flairs out from the tree. This is called the root flair. This root flair should show when the tree is planted. If necessary, add soil under the ball so the root flair is exposed.
  • Place fertilizer packets into the bottom of the hole (if purchased). *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer.
  • Backfill the hole with soil, making sure the top of the root ball is visible and slightly higher than the soil around it.
  • Firm the soil around the plant. Water well to settle soil around the root ball.

Pruning – After Planting

  • Bare Root – Prune ALL bare root plants to reduce transplant shock and ensure success. Pruning should occur either before or as soon after planting as possible. All pruning should be done with a sharp pruning shears.
  • B&B & containers – Although it is not essential for B&B or containers to be pruned after planting, a light pruning for shape, to remove any broken branches from shipping, or to thin out a heavily branched plant will help in the transplanting process and in the appearance of your new planting.

Pruning – Through-out the Season

  • Prune in spring to remove small shoots along the trunk, suckers, water sprouts and competing branches. Prune out dead, diseased or broken branches any time. Honeylocust trees can have a myriad of insects and diseases attacking them.

Watering – After Planting

  • Plants typically take approximately 6 weeks to establish new roots in your soil. During this period, water plants as often as every 2-4 days at the start and at least a minimum of once per week.
  • Beyond the 6 week establishment period, water once per week, unless rains occur.
  • Stick your finger into the soil around 3” to check soil moisture.

Watering – Through-out the Season

  • After the first season, plants should only be watered during extended periods without rain.
  • How do you know if your plants need water? The easiest way to tell is to touch the soil around the roots. If it is moist, there is no need to water. If it is dry, give it a good soaking with the hose end (no nozzle) watering the soil only, not the leaves.
  • Stick your finger into the soil around 3” to check soil moisture.

Arbor Hills Tree Farm & Nursery Omaha

We provide the Highest Quality Field Grown Nebraska Trees and Shrubs – directly to our customers, at the lowest possible price.

Whether you are looking for trees for:

  • new home landscaping
  • wind blockage
  • commercial or residential

Arbor Hills will work with you to provide the most beautiful Nebraska grown trees available. Most trees can be delivered and planted within 5 to 7 days if you reside in the Omaha metro area.